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Тренинги, Курсы, Обучение — Agile, Scrum, OKR
Тренинги, Курсы, Обучение — Agile, Scrum, OKR
Тренинги, Курсы, Обучение — Agile, Scrum, OKR
17 October, 2022 г.
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Does the Broken Windows Theory work?

While many people agree with this principle, others argue that it has not been proven scientifically. For example, some say there are other factors involved…

Does the Broken Windows Theory work?

The broken windows theory has been widely debated since it was first proposed in 1982. It states that if a neighborhood displays signs of neglect, such as broken windows or litter, it will send a message to the community that no one cares about the area and that no one is watching it. This encourages more vandalism and crime to occur, which in turn leads to even more neglect and further decay.

While many people agree with this principle, others argue that it has not been proven scientifically. For example, some say there are other factors involved in crime rates, including poverty levels and unemployment rates. Others point out that the theory does not account for the fact that areas can be kept clean by residents who take pride in their homes and neighborhoods.

The broken windows theory, first introduced in 1982 by James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling, suggests that small signs of disorder are often precursors to larger problems. A broken window, or a single instance of graffiti, might seem like a minor problem, but without addressing the small infractions and vandalism that occur in an area, it can lead to greater issues like crime and blight. The theory has been used to explain how urban decay leads to violent crime, but it's also been applied to other areas including schools and workplaces.

The idea behind the broken windows theory is that if an area is kept clean and orderly, people will feel safer and more comfortable there. If they see signs of disorder—like graffiti or litter—they'll think no one cares about the space and start behaving badly themselves. In contrast, if signs of disorder are removed quickly, people will be more likely to follow suit.

The theory has been widely criticized by academics who argue that it fails to acknowledge the many factors at play in crime, including poverty, racism, and drug use. However, despite these objections, the theory has been used by law enforcement agencies as justification for increased arrests and harsher penalties for minor offenses.

Some researchers have found that the theory does not hold up when they take into account other factors that determine whether or not a neighborhood is prone to crime. For example, areas with high poverty levels tend to have higher rates of crime regardless of how well-kept their environment is.