Get All Materials From Our Trainings — For Free
Тренинги, Курсы, Обучение — Agile, Scrum, OKR
Тренинги, Курсы, Обучение — Agile, Scrum, OKR
Тренинги, Курсы, Обучение — Agile, Scrum, OKR
17 October, 2022 г.
1 отзыв, в среднем 5 из 5

What is the Nadler-Tushman congruence model?

The Nadler-Tushman congruence model is a way to understand how different groups within an organization work together and make…

What is the Nadler-Tushman congruence model?

The Nadler-Tushman congruence model is a way to understand how different groups within an organization work together and make decisions. It looks at whether or not the various groups have the same goals, values, and priorities.

This model was developed by two professors at Harvard Business School in 1984 and has been used by many organizations since then.

It's a useful tool for understanding how different groups in an organization might interact with one another and make decisions, because it helps you see where there are disconnects between different parts of your company.

The Nadler-Tushman congruence model is a model that helps organizations understand how to best align their teams and executives. This model asks three main questions:

  1. What are the roles of each team member?

  2. How do those roles relate to one another?

  3. What does each person need from the other, in order to achieve their goals?

The Nadler-Tushman congruence model is a theory that explains how to make effective and lasting organizational change. The theory was developed in the 1980s by two researchers, Alan Nadler and Joseph Tushman, who observed that many organizations made ineffective changes to their structure and processes without fully understanding why they were making those changes. The Nadler-Tushman congruence model is used to determine whether an organizational change will be effective or not, based on three factors: the degree of congruence between the organization's current and desired states; the degree of congruence between its short-term goals and long-term vision; and whether it has clear goals.

The first factor determines whether a company has made truly necessary changes. If there isn't any difference between what the company currently does and what it wants to do, then no change has occurred. This can be difficult for companies with multiple divisions that don't share information or where one division doesn't understand what another division is doing.

The second factor determines whether a company knows what it wants to achieve. If there isn't any difference between what a company wants in the future and its current state, then no change has occurred either.